Hufflepuff scarf DIY

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Group costumes are fun to do. This most recent Halloween was no exception. However, for whatever reason, I really did not feel like going all out when making my costume. My coworkers and I decided to do Harry Potter themed costumes. We decided to go the easy route and be Hogwarts students. I was able to find a Gryffindor robe at my local Goodwill. I had the black skirt, white button down shirt, and grey sweater in my closet. I don’t really think of myself as possessing grand amounts of courage, so I chose to go with Hufflepuff as my house. I purchased a tie from Hot Topic, and printed out a sticker of the house crest to cover the Gryffindor crest on the thrifted robe. Since it is possible to have large amounts of snow during Halloween in Ohio, I wanted to make sure to have as many warm elements to my costume as possible. A scarf with my house colors seemed like a really good idea. I was able to find this tutorial here: http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=431081#axzz2sCK8PZ00

I decided that I wanted the colors to alternate for the front and back of the scarf, as well as from side to side. Obviously, I did not think it through completely, as this would result in a checkerboard type finish and not look at all like any of the Hogwarts merchandise already in existence, whether officially licensed or fan made. Plus, in my efforts to get the colors as close as possible to the tie that I had purchased, I ended up with a scarf that looks more like a sports ball fan item than a magical student fan item. So, I highly recommend that you follow the instructions as laid out by graverobbergirl if you are going to follow her tutorial. Don’t be like me and end up with a scarf that looks like it would be worn by someone who doesn’t even know what Quidditch is. Or do. I’m not your supervisor.

Anyway, I did most everything as instructed by graverobbergirl, changing only the number of pieces that I cut out to give me equal numbers of each color. I had a 4×6 card that I was able to use as a pattern guide to cut out the majority of my pattern pieces.

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Once I had all my pieces cut out, all I had to do was sew them together in alternating colors. And, voila. A scarf that I didn’t even wear with my costume. Hey, they can’t all be wildly successful experiences. Sometimes things don’t turn out as planned. This has taught me that if I want my end result to look like someone else’s end result, then I probably shouldn’t change their pattern.

Happy sewing!

EDIT: Apparently this entry didn’t get posted after I wrote it. I was probably planning on adding a picture of how the scarf turned out, but I no longer have the scarf in my possession, so that is unlikely to happen. If I am able to find an image, I will add it in the future. Thanks for reading!

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